Seasonal Tips

Seasonal Tips

  1. Seasonal allergies can spell misery for many kids. As plants and trees bloom each spring, millions of children begin to sneeze and sniffle. To limit exposure to the allergens causing their symptoms, keep children inside on windy days. Keep windows closed, have your child shower every night, and use a humidifier in their bedroom. If symptoms are affecting your child’s daily routine, please ask us about possible medications.
  2. The American Academy of Pediatrics estimates that sleep problems affect 25 to 50% of children and 40% of adolescents. Many studies show that inadequate sleep can lead to a variety of behavioral and health problems. To promote restful sleep, start by establishing a good bedtime routine. Avoid screen time for at least one hour before bed and choose quiet activities like reading instead. Avoid meals close to bedtime and encourage plenty of physical activity throughout the day. If sleep problems persist, please discuss any concerns with your pediatrician.
  3. Nine out of ten poison incidents involving children occur inside the home. If spring cleaning is on your agenda, keep your child’s safety in mind. Remember that even if a cleaning product is labeled as natural, it does not mean non-toxic. Some natural products such as essential oils can be dangerous if ingested or inhaled. Check that all cleaning products, chemicals and medications are stored out of reach of children and make sure that cabinet latches and locks are in good condition. Please don’t hesitate to call Poison Control at 1-800-222-1222 for free, expert, confidential help.
  4. Spring is here and we’re embracing the change in weather. It’s time to dust off those bikes and get moving – but not without a helmet. According to the AAP, bicycling is the leading cause of recreational sports injuries treated in emergency departments, but a helmet can prevent the occurrence of up to 88 percent of serious brain injuries. When shopping for a helmet, check the inside label to ensure CPSC safety standards. Any helmets involved in a crash or otherwise damaged should be discarded, and all helmets should be replaced at least every five years. Model safe behavior for your children by wearing a helmet when bicycling.