Seasonal Tips

Seasonal Tips

  1. RSV, respiratory syncytial virus, often occurs between late fall and early spring. Symptoms of RSV in children are similar to the common cold in adults; runny nose, fever, cough, and congestion. While most cases of RSV resolve on their own within one or two weeks, severe cases can require hospitalization. In children younger than one year of age, RSV infections are the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia. If your child is having trouble breathing, showing signs of dehydration, or experiencing symptoms that are not improving, please call us.
  2. Every year, thousands of children are diagnosed with diabetes, a metabolic disorder that affects how the body turns food into energy. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas loses its ability to produce insulin, causing a building of glucose in the bloodstream. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the body doesn’t respond to it normally. Common signs of diabetes can include frequent urination, increased thirst or appetite, vomiting, and weight loss. If these symptoms sound familiar, please talk to your doctor.
  3. changing leaves, apple picking, and pumpkin carving are exciting signs of autumn, but for children with seasonal allergies, fall can make outdoor activities downright miserable. Ragweed is the most common trigger for fall allergies as the plants release pollen into the air. Though each plant lives only one season, that one plant can produce up to one billion pollen grains! Another common fall allergy trigger is mold which can thrive in damp leaf piles. If your child cannot find relief from fall allergies, Promise Pediatrics can help you develop a treatment plan.
  4. Americans purchase nearly 600 million pounds of candy each year. That’s equivalent to the weight of almost 6 Titanic ships! Looking for healthier options for trick or treating this year? Hand out small toys like bouncy balls, bubbles, glow sticks, or containers of slime. How about spooky stickers, craft supplies, or silly straws? Handing out non-food treats is also a great way to keep Haloween safe and inclusive for children with life-threatening food allergies. Take the Teal Pumpkin Pledge by placing a teal pumpkin in front of your home to indicate that you’re a safe stop on Halloween.
  5. Even though COVID-19 continues to be a concern, children are continuing to catch typical illnesses such as the common cold, Strep A, and stomach bugs. If your child runs a fever over 101F, has a headache, or has cold-like symptoms that last more than 24 hours, please, let us know that you need an appointment to bring your child into our office.